Thoracolumbar spine fractures without neurological deficit



Publisher: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in Rosemont, IL

Written in English
Cover of: Thoracolumbar spine fractures without neurological deficit |
Published: Pages: 96 Downloads: 650
Share This

Subjects:

  • Spine -- Fractures.,
  • Thoracic vertebrae.,
  • Lumbar vertebrae.,
  • Spinal Fractures -- therapy.,
  • Orthopedics.,
  • Thoracic Vertebrae -- injuries.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 88-93) and index.

Statementedited by E. Shannon Stauffer ; contributors, Howard S. An ... [et al.].
SeriesAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons monograph series
ContributionsStauffer, E. Shannon., An, Howard S.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRD768 .T48 1993
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 96 p. :
Number of Pages96
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1227889M
ISBN 10089203100X
LC Control Number94228879
OCLC/WorldCa29322806

Methods: A retrospective study in 25 patients with fractures of thoracic and lumbar spine burst fractures without neurological deficit. Eleven patients underwent conservative treatment and for the. To evaluate the post-traumatic disc degeneration and range of motion 10 years after short-segment fixation without fusion for thoracolumbar burst fractures with neurological deficit. Summary of Background Data. Early clinical results of short-segment fixation without fusion for thoracolumbar burst fractures were satisfactory. To test the hypotheses that thoracolumbar AO Type A spine fractures without neurologic deficit, managed with short-segment posterior stabilization will show an improved radiographic outcome and at. Operative management of thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficit may improve residual kyphosis, but does not appear to improve pain or function at an average of 4 years after.

Management of thoracolumbar spine fractures with neurologic disorder Article Literature Review in Orthopaedics & Traumatology Surgery & Research (1) January with 17 Reads. Nonoperative treatment versus posterior fixation for thoracolumbar junction burst fractures without neurologic deficit. Spine (Phila Pa ). ; 26(9)Cited by: International Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research (ISSN: ) is a peer-reviewed journal that publishes results of experimental and clinical research in Author: Krishnakumar Rangasamy. Neurological deficit and canal compromise in thoracolumbar and lumbar burst fractures. J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) ; 16 (1): 20 – Crossref, Medline, Google Scholar; Rajasekaran S. Thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurological deficit: the role for conservative treatment. Eur Spine J ; 19 (suppl 1): S40 – SCited by:

10q: Assertion: Pure dislocation (without associated fracture) does not occur in the lumbar spine. Reason: The facets of the lumbar spine are stout and vertically placed where as cervical spine facets are short and more horizontally placed. a. Assertion is True but Reasoning is false b. Assertion is false but Reasoning is true c. Both are true d. Both are false. Thoracic spine fracture-dislocations are severe forms of spinal column injuries that occur secondary to high-energy trauma, in which there is vertebral fracture concomitant with dislocation of facet joints and/or the intervertebral disc space. They are mechanically unstable and . Thoracolumbar Fractures. Fractures to the thoracolumbar spine are not uncommon. Most commonly these present in the elderly population and are caused by osteoporosis. patients without neurological deficits benefited more when spine fractures were treated with conservative treatment than those treated with prophylactic surgical intervention. A spinal fracture, also called a vertebral fracture or a broken back, is a fracture affecting the vertebrae of the spinal types of spinal fracture confer a significant risk of spinal cord the immediate trauma, there is a risk of spinal cord injury (or worsening of an already injured spine) if the fracture is unstable, that is, likely to change alignment without Other names: Vertebral fracture, broken back.

Thoracolumbar spine fractures without neurological deficit Download PDF EPUB FB2

Wood K, Buttermann G,Mehbod A, Garvey T, Jhanjee R, Sechriest V () Operative compared with nonoperative treatment of a thoracolumbar burst fracture without neurological deficit. A prospective, randomized by: Thoracolumbar spine fractures remain a significant source of potential morbidity.

Advances in treatment have minimized the invasiveness of our surgery and in certain stable situations, eliminated it all together. Previous article. in by: Traditionally, conservative treatment of thoracolumbar (TL) burst fractures without neurologic deficit has encompassed the application of an extension brace.

However, their effectiveness on maintaining the alignment, preventing posttraumatic deformities, and improving back pain, disability.

Operative management of thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficit may improve residual kyphosis, but does not appear to improve pain or function at an average of 4 years after injury and is associated with higher complication rates and by: Complete fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine without a neurological deficit is a rare entity.

Early diagnosis is important before performing any dangerous maneuvers. Long instrumentation with bony fusion is the recommended surgical method. The prognosis is promising after the patients undergo by: 2.

Muller U, Berlemann U, Sledge J, Schwarzenbach O. Treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficit by indirect reduction and posterior instrumentation: bisegmental stabilization with monosegmental fusion.

Eur Spine J. ; – doi: /sCited by: 9. The thoracolumbar junction from T11 to L2 is a common site of injury in which fracture and dislocations are the most prevalent ones occurring at this location. Fracture dislocation is defined as failure of all three columns of the spine with gross displacement.

Considering the significant violence necessary to produce fracture dislocations, these injuries are often associated with major neural deficit Cited by: 2.

Operative management of thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficit may improve residual kyphosis, but does not appear to improve pain or function at an average of 4 years after injury and is associated with higher complication rates and by: —The Editors Burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine without neurologic deficit are a relatively common injury.

A burst fracture results from a compression load without associated shear, rotation, or translational injury.Cited by:   The literature suggests that spinal fractures acquired after minimal trauma in osteoporotic patients cause neurological problems only extremely rarely. This report describes 9 patients with severe osteoporosis in whom minimal trauma led to a fracture of the thoracic or lumbar spine causing significant neurological by: lcalá-Cerra G, Paternina-Caicedo AJ, Díaz-Becerra C, Moscote-Salazar LR, Fernandes-Joaquim A.

Orthosis for thoracolumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficit: a systematic review of prospective randomized controlled trials. J Craniovertebr Junction Spine Cited by: [14%] of thoracolumbar fractures in one series3 [15%] offractures in another1).

Despite the fact that it is such a common fracture, there are various opin-ions regarding the ideal management, especially in patients without an associated neurological deficit. Researchers have advocated both an operative2,3, and a. Thoracolumbar fractures leading to major kyphosis with a potential compromise of the spinal canal are usually treated surgically.

There is still no consensus on the primary management of these fractures, and it is not clear if an MIS or classic open reduction should be preferred for severe deformities in non-neurological by:   Wood K, Buttermann G, Mehbod A, Garvey T, Jhanjee R, Sechriest V.

Operative compared with nonoperative treatment of a thoracolumbar burst fracture without neurological deficit. A prospective, randomized study. J Bone Joint Surg Am. ;A(5)– PubMed Google Scholar. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Thoracolumbar spine fractures without neurological deficit.

Rosemont, IL: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, © In a study of cases of neurologic spinal trauma, deficits were tetraplegia (%), paraplegia (%) or cauda equina syndrome (%). Pathophysiology Lesion mechanisms.

Thoracolumbar spine fractures can damage the thoracic spinal cord, Cited by: Request PDF | Thoracolumbar Spine Trauma | Thoracolumbar fractures account for nearly 90% of all spinal fractures and are typically acquired through high-energy.

Selection criteria and outcome of operative approaches for thoracolumbar burst fractures with and without neurological deficit. Charles L. Schnee M.D. 1 and Lee V. Ansell M.D. 1 Anterior fixation for fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine with or without neurologic by: Introduction.

Thoracolumbar spine fractures and dislocations are complex lesions that often occur in young people, usually as a result of high-energy traumas such as road traffic accidents and falls.1, 2, 3 Neurological injuries can occur in 15–40% of these fractures4, 5 and over 30% of patients may develop chronic pain that leads to limitations in activities of daily living and difficulty Author: Alejandro Lorente, Rafael Lorente, Bárbara Rosa, Pablo Palacios, Jesús Burgos, Carlos Barrios.

neurological deficits. The first is spinal canal sparing due to the fracture of the middle column of the L1 vertebral body. Only a few cases with fracture-dislocation of the thoracolumbar spine without severe neurological dysfunction have been reported; some of these had middle column fractures, such as pedicle or facet fractures, which caused Cited by: 2.

Materials and methodsPatients with burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit were randomized to receive either the Wiltse’s paraspinal approach (group A, open book laminectomy in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures.

Materials and methods: Patients with burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit were randomized to receive either the Wiltse’s paraspinal approach (group A, 24 patients) or open bookAuthor: Zhi-da Chen, Jin Wu, Xiao-tao Yao, Tao-yi Cai, Wen-rong Zeng, Bin Lin.

For patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures with spinal canal compromise but no neurological deficit, if when the posterior intraoperative fixation is performed, the spinal canal fracture is partially recovered, the posterior vertebral body height of the injured vertebrae is significantly restored, the spinal canal volume ratio is significantly increased, and the large kyphosis is corrected, then the Author: Lijie Yuan, Lijie Yuan, Shaofeng Yang, Yuan Luo, Dawei Song, Qi Yan, Cenhao Wu, Huilin Yang, Jun Zou.

Abstract Aim: Provide a comprehensive review of literature regarding the classification systems and surgical management of thoracolumbar spine trauma. Methods: A Pubmed search of ‘thoracolumbar’, ‘spine’, ‘fracture’ was used on Janu Exclusionary criteria included non-Human studies, case reports, and non-clinical papers.

Wood KB, Butterman GR, Phukan R, Harrod CC, Mehbod A, Shannon B, Bono CM, Harris MB. Operative compared with nonoperative treatment of a thoracolumbar burst fracture without neurological deficit: a prospective randomized study with follow-up at sixteen to twenty-two years.

J Bone Joint Surg Am. ;–9. CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar. Thoracolumbar burst fractures in patients with neurological deficit: Anterior approach versus posterior percutaneous fixation with laminotomy Author links open overlay panel Seung-Ryul Shin a Shin-Seok Lee b Ju-Hwi Kim c Ji-Ho Jung a Seul-Kee Lee a Gwang-Jun Lee a Bong Ju Moon a Jung-Kil Lee a.

The most common fractures of the spine are associated with the thoracolumbar junction. The goals of treatment of thoracolumbar fracture are leading to early mobilization and rehabilitation by restoring mechanical stability of fracture and inducing neurologic recovery, thereby enabling patients to return to the by:   Despite extensive published research on thoracolumbar burst fractures, controversy still surrounds which is the most appropriate treatment.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the scientific literature on operative and nonoperative treatment of patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures and no neurological by:   Seventy-five surgically treated patients with thoracolumbar fractures and fracture dislocations, operated on between and at the Orthopedic Department of the University of Basel, were analyzed.

The follow-up ranged from 18 months to 6 years. There were 45 men and 21 women, and 60% of the patients were not more than 30 years by:   Patients with burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine without neurological deficit were randomized to receive either the Wiltse’s paraspinal approach (group A, 24 patients) or open book laminectomy (group B, 23 patients).

Patients were followed postoperatively for average of  : Zhi-da Chen, Jin Wu, Xiao-tao Yao, Tao-yi Cai, Wen-rong Zeng, Bin Lin. Thoracolumbar spine fractures may be present in major trauma patients without symptoms Although much attention has been paid to improving the diagnosis of cervical spine injuries over the past few years, fractures of the thoracolumbar spine have received comparatively little attention.

Several reports have indicated that back pain and bony tenderness may be absent in some Cited by: Ludwig Ombregt MD, in A System of Orthopaedic Medicine (Third Edition), Vertebral body fractures. The thoracolumbar spine is the most common site for vertebral fractures. 78 In younger patients, thoracolumbar vertebral fractures are usually caused by high-energy accidents such as falls, or motor vehicle accidents; whereas in elderly patients, osteoporosis is the dominant aetiology.

(OBQ) You are seeing a year-old female who fell out of her second story apartment window. She complains of severe low back pain and right buttock pain. Her neurologic exam shows she is an ASIA E. Imaging shows a L3 burst fracture with 10 degrees of kyphosis, 30% loss of vertebral body height, and retropulsion of bone with 20% occlusion of the spinal canal/5.